Severe Back Pain

Severe back pain (such as pain that is bad enough to interrupt sleep) that happens with other signs of severe illness (e.g. unexplained weight loss, fever) may also indicate a serious underlying medical condition, such as cancer. Severe back pain could be a result of a number of problems ranging from muscle strain to inflammation of the gall bladder. If you are experiencing severe back pain you should consult a doctor instantly. Severe back pain can be an every day misery, which turns what could be a normal happy life into a struggle. Let’s face it; severe back pain is a tough problem to tackle. There is a lot going on in the back, including a blend of bone muscle and cartilage. Understanding severe back pain ailments can be difficult, but often various doctors are successful at diagnosing and treating back pain.

Transient back pain is likely one of the primary symptoms of influenza. Muscle strains (pulled muscles) are normally identified as the cause of back pain, but muscle imbalances are by far the most common cause of low back pain. Severe back Pain from such an injury often remains as long as the muscle imbalances persist. The muscle imbalances cause a mechanical problem with the skeleton, building up force at points along the spine. Another cause of severe back pain is a Meniscoid Occlusion. The more mobile regions of the spine have invaginations of the synovial membrane, which act as a quasi-meniscus. This is a cushion to help the bones move over each other efficiently. The synovial casing is well supplied with blood and nerves. When it becomes pinched or trapped it can cause sudden severe back pain. The pinching causes the membrane to become inflamed causing greater stress and ongoing pain. Symptoms include severe back pain that may be accompanied by muscle spasm, pain with walking, concentration of pain to one side and no rediculopathy (radiating pain down buttocks and leg. Relief should be felt with flexion, exacerbated with expansion.

Severe Back Pain

When severe back pain lasts more than three months, or if there is more leg pain than back pain, a more specific diagnosis can usually be made. There are different common causes of back pain: for adults under age 50, these include spinal disc herniation and degenerative disc disease or isthmis spondylolisthesis; in adults over age 50, common causes also include osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) and spinal stenosis. Non-anatomical factors can also contribute to or cause back pain, such as stress, repressed depression or anger. Even if there is an anatomical cause for the pain, if despair is present it should also be treated concurrently. Physical therapy and exercise, including stretching and strengthening (with specific focus on the muscles which support the spine), often learned with the help of a fitness professional, such as a physical therapist. Physical therapy, when part of a back school, can recover back pain. Massage therapy, particularly from a very experienced therapist, may help. Acupressure or pressure point massage may be greater than the classic massage.